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The National Museum

Go time travelling at Denmark’s key history museum. The National Museum showcases everything from Viking treasure and the Egtved girl’s grave to Egyptian mummies, Renaissance art and the present day. 

Among the many treasures to discover, visitors are invited to Meet the Vikings in an exhibition that reconstructs what Queen Tove may have looked like, alongside warrior Beserkers, housewives and peasants, many shown wearing jewellery from Denmark's largest treasure troves. Another key permanent exhibition on Danish Antiquity includes prominent national treasures such as the more than 3,000 years old Sun Chariot, the Bronze Age Egtved Girl, and an incredible collection of archaeological finds from the Viking Age. You can also see the Huldremose Woman, whose well-preserved remains are estimated to date back to the first decade of the first century AD.

The National Museum also boasts a very large ethnographical collection, a collection of classical and near eastern antiquities, a coin- and medal collection, and a toy museum. You can also visit the Victorian apartment Klunkehjemmet, practically unchanged since 1890. Note that it has different opening hours.

You can tour the museum in an hour with a self-guided tour. They include The History Tour of Denmark, The Family Tour, and The Tour around the World. In July, August, and September there are guided tours in English.

The Children's Museum

One section, dedicated especially to the very young museum visitor, is The Children’s Museum. What was the school of your great-grandmother like? Try a trip on a Viking ship, discover a kitchen from the Middle Ages, or amire the beautiful colors and feel the smooth silk in a shop from Pakistan. This hands-on part of the museum is great for children who want to play and explore.

Restaurant SMÖR 

Besides the café and a museum shop, the museum is home to the excellent Restaurant SMÖR. Here you will find Danish classics like smørrebrød (open-faced sandwiches) with a new twist. On the weekends you can try The National Museum's giant cake table with everything you could wish for. The restaurant focuses on local, seasoned ingredients and sustainability. No entrance is required when visiting the café, shop, or restaurant.  

The National Museum building

It's not just the exhibits in the museum that have historical significance – the building does too. The National Museum is located in The Prince’s Palace, built by court architect Nicolai Eigtved in 1743-44. It is no longer used by the royal family, but the Great Hall still appears elegant enough to fit princes and princesses.
 
The Gallery consists of a wide corridor that linked rooms and sleeping quarters and featured plenty of space for exquisite handicrafts. The stucco in the ceiling, the panels, and the oak parquet floor are all thought to be original. The furniture and stove are from the early 18th century.